丹麦,Fuglsang美术馆/ Tony Fretton Architects

Fuglsang美术馆是为存放Storstrøm美术馆的永久藏品——1780年至1980年的丹麦艺术品而建造的地区美术馆,由Tony Fretton建筑师事务所设计。建筑占地2500平方米,其中也有一些举办临时展览的新画廊、商店、咖啡店、学习中心及行政区域,还有用于保存美术馆海量绘画与雕刻艺术藏品的空间。

建筑师:Tony Fretton Architects

地点:Lolland, Denmark

景观设计师:Torben Schønherr Landscape

结构工程师:Birch & Krogboe A/S Consulting Engineers

执行建筑师:BBP ARKITEKTER A/S

项目面积:2,500 sqm

项目年份:2008

摄影:Helene Binet

一般前往城市美术馆路程都不远,而要想去Fuglsang美术馆须长途跋涉,经过一片开阔的乡村,途中的田园风光和海景也很令人震撼,四周零星分布着一些房屋,最后行至一条长而笔直的路上,通往位于庄园中央的庭院。

新美术馆是一幢低层建筑,小心翼翼地蹲伏在零星分布的乡村民宅中间。美术馆如周围村庄的红色谷仓和熔炉一般延伸到田间,同时与庄园中最重要的建筑——领主宅邸及其周围环境产生了一种奇异的轴向但却彼此错开的关系。美术馆上方设计了三个对角放置的屋顶天窗,刚好与领主宅邸立面上的三个山形墙呼应,再加上它的外形,进一步确立了两幢建筑物之间的联系。

美术馆的立面与周围乡村房屋以及许多丹麦现代派经典建筑作品一样,都由砖石建成。而且像庭院西侧的谷仓一样涂上白色,屋顶天窗用灰砖垒成,与周围房屋的屋顶颜色相配。

涂漆金属板雨篷为敞口立方体形式,又低又宽,可挡风遮雨,而且与建筑入口门厅内与之大小相同、透明度无异的挡风玻璃休息室十分搭配。

门厅的一端是咖啡馆,另一端是书店以及接待处,两侧的窗户都非常宽敞,从其中一扇看出去是庭院,从另一扇看出去则是公共艺术工作室及其身后现成的美丽花园。接待处的玻璃门显示了通往图书馆和二楼办公室的路,而其他的门则通往演讲厅、厕所和存衣处。

前厅是一处公共场所,这里的所有物品都摆放在触手可及之处,人们可以在Fuglsang美术馆的景色与各个空间中尽情享受与朋友或是陌生人相处的时光。从这里一眼就能望到美术馆长长的中央画廊。美术馆的画廊与前厅这种公共空间的大小、特色迥异,游客成群结队来到这里就会四散开去,专注地欣赏面前的艺术品。在中央画廊的尽头是一个完全由玻璃建成的房间,可欣赏大海及周围的乡村风貌,这里也是小憩与沉思的好去处。


Fuglsang Kunstmuseum is a purpose built regional art museum designed by Tony Fretton Architects to house the Storstrøm Art Museum’s permanent collection of Danish fine art dating from the period 1780-1980. The 2,500 sqm building also houses new galleries for temporary exhibitions, a shop, a café, a learning centre, administration spaces and storage for the museum’s large collection of painting and sculpture.

Architect: Tony Fretton Architects

Location: Lolland, Denmark

Landscape Architect: Torben Schønherr Landscape

Structural Engineer: Birch & Krogboe A/S Consulting Engineers

Executive Architect: BBP ARKITEKTER A/S

Project Area: 2,500 sqm

Project Year: 2008

Photographs: Helene Binet

Unlike the location of an urban museum that is reached through the room-like spaces of a city, to go to Fuglsang entails a long journey through open countryside, where the landscape and sea take on immense significance, finally arriving on a long straight road through a loose assembly of buildings to a courtyard at the heart of the Estate.

The new museum is a low-rise building, which sits discreetly within a loose assembly of rural buildings. Like the red barn and the forge in the surrounding countryside, the Museum extends into the fields while having a strange axial but offset relation to the most significant of the buildings, the Manor House and its formal surroundings. Connection between the two buildings is further established by the profile of the museum with its arrangement of three diagonal roof lights, which relate to the three gables in the façade of the Manor House.

Like the buildings around the courtyard, and many classic works of Danish modernism, the facades of the Museum are constructed from brick. As in the barn on the west side of the court, they are painted white and the roof lights are in a grey brick to match the colour of the roofs of the buildings around it.

A canopy of painted metal in the form of an open sided cube, low and wide, provides shelter from the rain, and is matched by a glass wind lobby of equal scale and transparency in the entrance foyer within the building.

One end of the foyer is arranged as a café, the other as a bookshop and reception area, both of which look out through extensive windows to the courtyard on one side and the other into a public art studio and beautiful existing garden behind it. A glass door in the reception area shows the way to the library and offices on the first floor, and other doors indicate the lecture hall, toilets and place to hang your coat.

The foyer is a public place in which everything is where it can be found and enjoyed in the company of friends and strangers within the landscape and spaces of Fuglsang. From within it there is a line of sight to the long central gallery of the Museum. The galleries are very different in scale and character from the public space of the foyer and are places into which groups of visitors can spread out and immerse themselves in the collection. At the end of the central gallery is a fully glazed room offering views of the sea and landscape, which is intended as a place to rest and reflect.