美国德克萨斯州,休斯顿,物理学布罗克曼大厅/ KieranTimberlake

建筑师: KieranTimberlake / James Timberlake, Stephen Kieran, Jason Smith, Steven Johns, George Ristow, Casey Boss

地点:美国德克萨斯州,休斯顿

客户:Rice University

项目年份:2011

项目面积:10,219 平方米

摄影: Peter Aaron (OTTO), Michael Moran (OTTO), Hester + Hardaway, Red Wing Aerials

室外项目经理:Linbeck

结构顾问:Haynes Whaley Associates

机电顾问:Ccrd Partners

实验室顾问:Innovate Lab Systems Design

景观设计师:The Office Of James Burnett

声效顾问:Je Acoustics

土木工程师:Walter P Moore

承包商:Gilbane Building Company

美国莱斯大学的物理学布罗克曼大厅将以前分散在校园五个教学楼内办公的物理实验教员聚集到了一起。如今,这里不但为该大学物理系、天文系、电子与计算机工程系的众位实验、理论和应用物理学家提供了工作场所,还将支持原子、分子和光学物理,生物物理,凝聚态物理,纳米工程和光子学方面的研究。作为(美国)国家标准与技术局颁发的联邦政府1110万美元鼓励基金的受益者,该建筑在短短33个月内就完成了设计和施工,对于这种规模的设施来说,其用时之短可称得上是前所未有。

建筑场地为矩形,差不多是一个足球场的大小,被原有的建筑包围,之所以从校园的十个备选场地中选择了这里,是因为这里固有振动水平较低,而且距离其余科学研究大楼较近。这一位置构成了一组独特的挑战,不但要在设计中综合考虑到这些挑战,还要满足实验室大楼的技术要求。关键问题是:建筑物怎样才能在莱斯大学经纬分布明确的校园之内容纳大量的实验室设备?建筑设计如何才能有助于减少实验室的能源消耗?建筑物怎样才能不影响到对校园环境举足轻重的景观设计?

为使这个110000平方英尺的项目与限制颇多的场地完美相融,建筑物被分成两条并行的长条结构,中间用玻璃廊桥相连,开放式的通道便于人们享受到自然光线与阵阵清风。最敏感的实验室被设置在建筑下层,由极其坚固的结构确保其稳定性。其中一个长条结构被抬高,保留了原有方形广场的重要作用,而长条结构下方的一系列聚会空间也将建筑功能延伸到了室外。抬高的长条结构有一个不对称的拱形天花板,如同浮在地面之上,由外观如同木板制成的混凝土柱子支撑。两个长条结构之间的通道旨在提升方形广场上方两座建筑物之间的交通流线,并扩大景观与建筑物之间的联系。绿色屋顶具有保温隔热功能,也为下层实验室上方的建筑物提供了供水管理。

两个长条结构经过独特设计,拥有八个透明立面,与周围景观融为一体。每个立面均被调整到能最大化利用太阳能的角度,并且毗邻其他建筑,从而减少了建筑体积,也能让丰富的自然光线进入大楼。北立面的玻璃幕墙采用了彭罗斯图形,暗示了内部进行的活动。南立面在复合铝板框架上安装了赤褐色的水平遮阳板,不但能防止实验室遭到曝晒,还能调控自然光线,保护室内人们的隐私。南侧长条结构的底层由玻璃砖围合,从而获得了充分的透明度,夜晚开灯之后也能让周围都被照亮。玻璃砖之间的黏土砖与校园其他建筑上的传统砖墙立面形成了呼应关系。

在底层离主要入口不远处,有一条中央楼梯衔接起新楼的上部与下部楼层。变色玻璃板在前厅的墙面上映射出斑斓的色彩,显示出这是一个公共空间,也是通往主要楼梯的入口。一间布置灵活的教室和150个座位的演讲厅共同构成了底层的公共空间。在演讲厅,一面造型柔和的木屏风和混凝土梁之间的双层高拱形石膏天花板令空间显得更广阔,并有助于调节房间内的光线与声效。

布罗克曼大厅是在对莱斯大学建筑的背景、文化、要素、形式、图像、物质性以及用途进行细致分析后得出的成果。我们试图采用与校园内其他建筑材料相同的材料,沿用以前的建造工艺,并将历史悠久的设计思想转化为当代的细节设计。该建筑不但利用了校园建筑的瘦削感,还满足了实验室大楼的设计要求,充分表达出莱斯大学精良的21世纪建筑设计理念与教学纲领。

Kieran Timberlake提供文本


Architects: KieranTimberlake / James Timberlake, Stephen Kieran, Jason Smith, Steven Johns, George Ristow, Casey Boss

Location: Houston, Texas,USA

Client: Rice University

Project Year: 2011

Project Area: 10,219 sqm

Photographs: Peter Aaron (OTTO), Michael Moran (OTTO), Hester + Hardaway, Red Wing Aerials

External Project Manager: Linbeck

Structural Consultant: Haynes Whaley Associates

Mep Consultant: Ccrd Partners

Lab Consultant: Innovate Lab Systems Design

Landscape Architect: The Office Of James Burnett

Acoustical Consultant: Je Acoustics

Civil Engineer: Walter P Moore

Contractors: Gilbane Building Company

The Brockman Hall for Physics gathers together a faculty of experimental physicists formerly scattered in as many as five separate buildings across the Rice University campus. It is now home to dozens of experimental, theoretical and applied physicists from Rice's departments of Physics and Astronomy and Electrical and Computer Engineering, and will support research in atomic, molecular and optical physics; biophysics; condensed matter physics; nanoengineering and photonics. A recipient of $11.1 million in federal stimulus funding from the National Institute of Standards and Technology, it was completed in a compressed design and construction schedule of just 33 months, an extremely short timeline for a facility of its kind.

The site, a rectangular landscape roughly the size of a soccer field and contained by existing buildings, was chosen out of ten potential sites on the campus for its low level of intrinsic vibration, and its proximity to other science buildings. This location posed a set of unique challenges that had to be synthesized in the design while meeting the difficult technical requirements of a laboratory building. Among the questions at play were: How can a building containing large labs fit within the distinct warp and weft of the Rice campus? How can the architecture help reduce the energy demand for the lab? How can the building retain the landscape that is so important to this campus?

To successfully fit 110,000 sqf of program into the constrained site, the building is split into two parallel bars connected by glass-enclosed bridges with an open passage that admits natural light and outdoor breezes. The most sensitive laboratories are located below grade, stabilized by an extremely robust structure. One of the bars is elevated to preserve a significant portion of the existing Quad, and a series of gathering spaces beneath it extends the building program outdoors. The raised bar has an asymmetrically vaulted ceiling, to float it above the ground plane, suspended by board-formed concrete columns. A pathway between the two bars is placed intently to enhance circulation between buildings on the Quad, extending the landscape-to-building-to-landscape connections. The green roof provides insulation and water management for the building above the lower level laboratories.

The two bars are uniquely arranged to knit the building into the landscape, resulting in eight transparent facades. Each facade is tuned to its solar conditions and adjacency to other buildings, minimizing the building's volume and allowing abundant natural light to enter the building. The north facade is a glass curtain wall with a Penrose frit pattern to hint at the activities going on inside. The south facade is a horizontal terra-cotta screen over aluminum composite panels that protect the labs from solar exposure while regulating natural light and privacy. The first story of the south bar is wrapped in glass bricks for transparency and an ambient glow when lit. Clay brick banding between the glass brick relates to the historic banded brick facades elsewhere on campus.

On the ground floor, immediately off the main entrance, a central stair connects the upper and lower levels of the new facility. Dichroic glass panels create colored reflective surfaces on the lobby walls announcing the public spaces and creating the entry to the main stair. A flexible classroom and 150-seat lecture hall form the public spaces at the ground floor. Within the lecture hall, a gently shaped wood screen and double vaulted plaster ceiling between concrete beams expand the space and help to moderate light and acoustics within the room.

Brockman Hall is a product of the careful analysis of context, culture, elements, form, iconography, materiality, and purpose in Rice's architecture. We sought to internalize the material palette of Rice, extend the legacy of craft, and translate historic themes into contemporary detailing. The massing capitalizes on the thinness of buildings on campus, while meeting the programmatic needs for a laboratory building; providing an edited and refined 21st century expression of Rice architecture and pedagogy.

Text provided by Kieran Timberlake