荷兰,恩斯赫德,文化建筑集群/ SeARCH

建筑师:SeARCH

地点:荷兰恩斯赫德

项目组:Bjarne Mastenbroek & Uda Visser

参与设计建筑师:Remco Wieringa, Ton Gilissen, Thomas van Schaick, Ad Bogerman, Wesley Lanckriet, Guus Peters, Alan Lam, Alexandra Schmitz, Fabian Wallmüller, Mónica Carriço, Nolly Vos w/ Frisly Colop, Michael Drobnik, Noëmi Vos, Bert van Diepen

客户:Gemeente Enschede, DMO

承包方:Heijmans IBC Van den Belt VOF

室内设计:Opera Ontwerpers (展览设计)

竣工时间:2008

项目面积:12,000 sqm

摄影:Christian Richters

2003年5月13日,一场烟花爆炸事故造成了毁灭性的破坏结果,导致恩斯赫德大量工业遗迹遭受到十分严重的损害,能够证明这座城市的纺织历史的建筑突然间变成了凤毛麟角。同时,纺织博物馆、自然博物馆和Twente历史博物馆等文化机构由于多年来对于其未来发展状况不确定而变得停滞不前。在这种情况下,政府决定在重建区域的中心建造一座新博物馆、研发中心以及其他几个文化机构。

另外,还决定保留并修复综合建筑的仓库和遗留下来的厂房墙壁,以及其他几个结构物,尽管它们并没有什么历史或建筑价值。因此该开发项目就位于这些现有的结构之中。

原本有规定,应该将公寓大楼作为新“文化建筑集群”的重心。但是SeARCH建筑事务所提议将这座大楼的住宅区域与博物馆的非公共功能区域互换,并使住宅区域在地面相连。这样一来,整个开发项目的特色就会得到突显,成为博物馆的巨大广告牌。

恩斯赫德丰富的纺织历史在大楼的“编织”造型中得到了体现。至今依然可见的现有厂房墙壁形成了锯齿状的屋顶形式,并且转变为一座人行桥,连接着大楼与“文化街”对面的仓库。

新建筑包含入口门厅、工作室、临时展览空间和办公室,也通过地下通道连接到仓库。这条地下通道和地上的连接桥在新建筑和仓库之间创造了一条回路,这样就没有必要给街道上方加顶盖了,同时还将1000平方米用处不大的地面包围起来。此外,包括住宅等所有功能区域现在都能从街道上直接进入。

在地面相连的住宅楼露台不得不减小面积,形成了高大而狭窄的立面。为了使各种功能都能显示在“文化街”的临街面上,入口大厅也以相似方式进行了压缩设计。位于临时展览空间上方的公寓楼未遭此待遇,而是充分利用了原有建筑与烟囱之间的狭窄开口,可以眺望场地北侧将要兴建的公园。


Architects: SeARCH

Location: Enschede, The Netherlands

Project Team: Bjarne Mastenbroek & Uda Visser

Assistants: Remco Wieringa, Ton Gilissen, Thomas van Schaick, Ad Bogerman, Wesley Lanckriet, Guus Peters, Alan Lam, Alexandra Schmitz, Fabian Wallmüller, Mónica Carriço, Nolly Vos w/ Frisly Colop, Michael Drobnik, Noëmi Vos, Bert van Diepen

Client: Gemeente Enschede, DMO

Contractor: Heijmans IBC Van den Belt VOF

Interior Design: Opera Ontwerpers (exhibition design)

Completion Date: 2008

Project Area: 12,000 sqm

Photographs: Christian Richters

The destruction caused by the fireworks explosion of May 13th 2000 resulted in a number of Enschede’s industrial monuments becoming so badly damaged, that evidence of the city’s textile history suddenly became scarce. Meanwhile, cultural institutions such as the Textile Museum, the Natural Museum and the Twente History Museum were stagnating due to years of uncertainty about their future. These circumstances led to the decision to construct a new museum, a research centre and several other cultural institutions in the heart of the neighbourhood to be rebuilt.

It was additionally decided to retain and restore the complex’s warehouse, a remaining factory wall and several other structures even though they were not of any historical or architectural value. The development is thus hemmed in by these existing structures.

It was originally stipulated that an apartment tower should form the centrepiece for the new ‘culture cluster’. SeARCH proposed to replace this tower’s residential accommodation with the museum’s non-public functions, and to make the dwellings ground-connected. In this way the distinguishing feature of the whole development would act as a huge billboard for the museum.

Enschede’s rich textile history is expressed in the ‘woven’ form of the tower. The saw-tooth roof form is generated by the still visible profile of the existing factory wall, and transforms into a pedestrian bridge connecting the tower to the warehouse on the opposite side of the ‘culture street’.

The new building, containing the entrance foyer, work ateliers, temporary exhibition spaces and office functions, is also connected to the ware-house via an underground connection. This subterranean link, and the bridge above, create a loop between the new building, the warehouse and back, negating the necessity to cover the street, and enclose 1000m2 of inefficient floor space. Furthermore, all functions, including the residential accommodation, can now be accessed from the street.

The terrace of ground-connected housing is compressed, resulting in facades that are tall and narrow. In order that each function receives frontage on the ‘culture street, ’the entrance hall is similarly squeezed. The apartments situated above the temporary exhibition space escape such treatment, utilising a narrow opening between the existing building and the chimney, to peek out over the park to be built to the north of the site.